Attending this event

Matthew Shoychet

Matthew Shoychet is a Canadian filmmaker, who has made short films, both narrative and documentary, for many years. The Accountant of Auschwitz is his feature film debut. Outside the world of film, Matthew sits on the Board of Directors for OneFamily Fund, which is the leading charity organisation that provides Israeli victims of terror and war, from all backgrounds, with therapeutic, financial and legal support.

Ricki Gurwitz

Ricki Gurwitz is a Canadian film producer who started her career in New York City, where she was a producer at WABC News Talk Radio. Moving back to Toronto in 2009, she took over the production of the TheBill Carroll Show and The Jerry Agar Show on Radio Newstalk 1010. In 2011, Ricki made the switch to television, joining the CTV News Channel as a segment and associate producer, working with reporters in the field to package news stories, and in the newsroom to cover the headlines of the day.  In 2015 Ricki left CTV to produce her first feature documentary, The Accountant of Auschwitz.

Amos Waldman

Born and raised in Manchester, Amos Waldman is a barrister practising from Doughty Street Chambers specialising in crime, international crime and human rights. He also appears at the International Criminal Court, in The Hague, which deals with crimes against humanity and war crimes, including genocide. The Accountant of Auschwitz holds particular significance for Amos; approximately 70 members of the family, on his mother’s side, met their deaths at Auschwitz.

Films screening at this event

The Accountant of Auschwitz

Director
Matthew Shoychet
Country
Canada
Year
2018
Duration
78 min

70 years after the end of the war, 94-year-old Oskar Gröning was charged with the murder of 300,000 Jews. The defendant’s age and his role in overseeing the confiscation of the victims’ possessions on arrival at the camp sparked worldwide debate on his culpability and fitness to stand trial. This powerful documentary explores complex legal and moral questions, questions that affect not only our remembrance of the Holocaust but also the promise it will never happen again.

Nominated – Audience Award: Hot Docs, Canadian International Documentary Festival (Placed Second overall) 

“The film tracks the evolution of international law over the decades, which eventually allowed authorities to make the case against people like Gröning, hiding in plain sight for 70 years.” Toronto Star

“One of the best Holocaust documentaries in decades” The Canadian Jewish News

“Emotionally powerful and intellectually challenging” 5/5 – NOW Magazine

“A sobering look at Nazi prosecutions” 3.5/4 – The Toronto Star

“Morbidly fascinating viewing” A, Original Cin